Tashkent War Agreement

Tashkent War Agreement

The Tashkent Declaration was a peace agreement signed on January 10, 1966 between India and Pakistan, which resolved the Indo-Pakistani War of 1965. Peace had been achieved on September 23 thanks to the intervention of external powers that pushed the two nations to a truce, fearing that the conflict would escalate and attract other powers. [1] [2] However, the ceasefire was fragile and the conflict could have resumed at any time. Having felt the need for a more binding agreement, the Soviet Union offered to act as a mediator with the personal participation of Kossygin, Chairman of the Council of Ministers of the USSR. According to contemporaries` memoirs, Kossygin played a crucial role in resolving the Indo-Pakistani conflict, as he enjoyed the trust of both sides. The agreement between India and Pakistan, which ended the largest military dispute over territorial disputes since World War II, was signed on January 10, 1966 in Tashkent, the capital of the Uzbek-era SSR. When negotiations began, the conflict between India and Pakistan posed a serious threatening to the stability of the region. This conflict between two major regional powers threatened to escalate into a much larger war, in which other states participated. India was threatened by China, which was then an ally of Pakistan.

Beijing has accused Delhi of aggression. The agreement brought only a ceasefire and nothing more. But the war proved important in many ways. First, it was the first successful operation that not only thwarted Pak`s attempt to conquer Kashmir, but also occupied strategic territories that exert considerable pressure on Pakistan. Pakistan has failed in its risk of changing the situation at J&K. Second, India`s war improved international prestige, especially after the Sino-Indian War of 1962. The Times indicated in its editorial that India would be Asia`s power. Third, it significantly improved relations with the Soviet Union and bore fruit during the 1971 war. Fourth India has begun to focus on the nuclear program to deal with the Chinese threat. Fifth, India has accelerated its defence procurement programme to strengthen its capabilities. Sixth, India has eliminated its weaknesses in gathering information and assessing skills that were noticed during the war. India has established its own external intelligence unit and has placed the Joint Intelligence Committee in the Cabinet Secretariat to make an overall assessment taking into account all dimensions.

These changes subsequently paid off. The relationship between the international politics of the Cold War and the Indo-Pak War of 1965 is important in two respects. First, the international politics of the Cold War influenced the nature of the conflict and the agreement that followed. In fact, the attitude of foreign powers has influenced the conflict and the changing scenes of the conflict on their approach to the parties involved. It would not be wrong to say that India is at war on two fronts: one on the battlefield and the other on the diplomatic front, and the two were closely linked. Second, the 1965 war involved the United States and the Soviet Union in a way that determined the path for further engagement of the superpower in the region. The 50th anniversary of the Tashkent Declaration, an agreement to end hostilities between India and Pakistan, was celebrated on Sunday, January 10. The declaration was signed in the Soviet Union, after mediation by Soviet diplomacy, personally led by Alexei Kossygin, Chairman of the Council of Ministers. This document is considered one of the best examples of the Soviet Union`s diplomatic mediation in world politics, even if the resulting peace does not last long. During the 1965 war, the Soviet Union offered its good offices for a peaceful solution between the two belligerent states.

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